Patrick M. Lydon

Lydon is founder of City as Nature, and serves as the arts editor for The Nature of Cities (New York). He has written about ecology and art for Kyoto Journal, YES! Magazine, The Mercury News, Resilience Journal. In 2019, he co-curated the Forum for Radical Imagination on Environmental Knowledge at Sorbonne University in Paris, and previously served a city-council-appointed role as Arts Commissioner for the City of San Jose (USA). His internationally exhibited artwork inspires empathic relationships between humans and nature, drawing on years of nomadic study with the farmer-philosophers of East Asia. He holds an MFA with distinction from the University of Edinburgh’s “Art, Space & Nature” program, with previous studies at Aichi University of Art, and California State University, San Jose. Together with his wife Suhee Kang, he co-directed the internationally-acclaimed film Final Straw: Food, Earth, Happiness, which has been translated into seven languages and continues to be screened around the world. He currently lives in Osaka, Japan, and tends to a natural urban garden with Suhee.
Nature Mandala

Nature Mandala

A team building exercise where groups work together to build a giant mandala from locally-foraged natural materials, celebrating local nature, and building stronger relationships with the environment and each other.

Plant and Place

Plant and Place

Participants learn simple ways to preserve and use plants to make postcards, exploring the shapes, textures, and colors of local plants, and using them to tell the story of places in more delicate and intimate ways than a traditional postcard.

Color Of Soil and Season

Color Of Soil and Season

An art-making workshop where participants discover the importance of the billions of individual living beings in the soil as we slowly delicately, and mindfully explore the myriad colors and life to be found in soil, stone, and other local natural elements.

Osakako Mandala

Osakako Mandala

Comprising over 7,000 individual leaves collected from beneath a tree, this temporary ‘meditative” installation was created in public view over the course of four weeks at Contemporary Art Space Osaka as part of the Robert Callender International Residency.